A Growing Community of Fearless Educators

11/23/2005 10:13:00 pm

I really like the school I work at. In the last little while there has been a real blog growth spurt.

As of yesterday all our administrators have their own blogs!

»Mr. Beaumont, our principal, is blogging at The View From DMCI.

Excerpted from his first post:

Where there is passion, there is hope! Is not our function as teachers to provide opportunity and guidance in the same way that a judicious parent would want? Do we, as parents, not take it upon ourselves to encourage opportunity and the searh for personal excellence in our kids? Do we not teach our children how to be" safe" by teaching them how to be discriminant users and observers? If our function is to prepare our students for the future, why would we insist on teaching them in the same way that we were taught 20, 30, 40 years ago? Blocks and filters don't keep our students safe (actually, they are more for our own benefit, that we are allowed to feel safer.... most of these can be circumvented anyway). I find the position just a bit short-sighted.

»Mrs. Silva, vice principal, is blogging at DMCI talks.

An excerpt from her blog:

When I was in the classroom, I used to have students use journals as a way of reflecting on their learning. I see this as their next step.What do you think about all this?

»Mrs. Zaporzan, vice principal, is blogging at DMCI Perspectives.

Brand spanking new bloggers that have really jumped into the conversation with both feet.

You already know about Erin Armstrong's S1 Math blog. Now she's also got a personal blog called My life in a bowl of jellybeans .... If you've read her stuff at the S1 Math blog you'll understand the connection to jellybeans -- but read her first post; great title, fantastic content! No previews here, go read it! ;-)

»Darrell Mazur, history teacher, is blogging at Mr. Mazur's History Blog. Check out the discussion he inspired in his students with his first post:

The Greatest Leader?
Was it Caesar? Was it Antony, Was it Cleopatra, or Octavius? Some of the above were masterful leaders. Some were crafty politicians. Some were manipulative oportunists.

Who would you want as your leader?

Drop in on them and give them a hearty welcome to the conversation -- they've just started and already they each have a distinctive voice.

A little heads up, I'm doing a blogshop with the math teachers from our school and two of our feeder schools on December 16. The buzz has gotten so loud we've receieved requests from teachers half way across the city to attend so we've opened it up to them as long as we've got space -- I'm expecting 20+ teachers in the room. Shortly after that there may be a few more people in Dean's kitchen; we might start spilling over into the den. ;-)

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